Asturian Bagpipe

The asturian bagpipe falls within the group of wind instruments or aerophones and the main characteristic is its air tank called the bellows.

The different pieces that make up this group are the following:

Bag made from the tanned hide skin of a goat, although it is currently manufactured in more modern materials. Stocks are the pieces that allow the union of the bag to the chanter, to the blowpipe and to the dron. Blowpipe is the part of the bagpipe that allows air to enter the bag and prevents it from escaping to the outside thanks to a leather reed. Dron is responsible for producing a low note called the bass, which sounds whenever the bagpipe is being played. It is composed of three parts and is assembled with each other thanks to the spikes. Chanter is in charge of producing the melody thanks to the to skill of the musician who covers and uncovers its holes. Its interior is conical.

Generally, a wood is sought that weighs little, as good sonority, is resistant, and has an attractive appearance. Normally the most used wood is the boxwood, but ebony, granadillo, mopane, cocobolo, kingwood, santos rosewood, tulip wood, pequia or bubinga

Asturian Bagpipe 

Subcategories

  • Boxwood

    BOTANICAL NAME: Buxus Sempervirens
    TRADE NAMES: Boxwood
    ORIGIN: Spain
    DESCRIPTION: Its density is 975 Kg/m3. The wood is of color cream to yellow, that tends to darken slightly with an exhibition prolonged to the light. The whiteness is not distinguished of the duramen. The Boxwood has a fine, uniform texture, with a natural luster. The grain tends to be straight or slightly irregular. It is an easy wood to carve and is usually used in wind musical instruments, rulers, handles, turned objects and other small specialty items.

  • Bubinga

    BOTANIC NAME: Guibourtia spp.

    COMMON NAMES : Bubinga

    ORIGIN:  Gabon

    DESCRIPTION: The Bubinga wood is hard and heavy. It has a fine grain and a high gloss finished. The Bubinga lumber works well except for some points that have resin. Some Bubinga tree trunks have uneven and pronounced grains, that make it a spectacular wood for lathe and carving as well to make Bubinga guitars.

  • Cocobolo (CITES)

    BOTANIC NAME: Dalbergia retusa

    COMMON NAMES: Exotic African Ebony, Exotic Black Ebony.

    ORIGIN:  Mexico

    DESCRIPTION: Red colour with dark grain. Density 990 – 1250 K/m3

    RECOMMENDATIONS: Considered as one of the substitutes to Brazilian Rosewood The oil it contains can cause problems when gluing. The sapwood is light yellow, although it may appear cream-colored and has a similar appearance to ivory. It is a wood whose colors are less intense when it is just sanded or cut and they darken with time. Its grain goes of straight to interlaced, is uniform and the texture is firm, having in addition a precious natural brightness.

  • Ebony

    BOTANIC NAME: Diospyros crassiflora hiern.

    COMMON NAMES: African Ebony, Black Ebony.

    ORIGIN:  Central and Western Africa.

    DESCRIPTION: Ebony wood is the African black gold. It is very hard and it has a great finished in the lathe. It is spectacular for turning and excellent to combine with other woods. The Ebony wood is used in certain level of carving and decorations. This wood is fragile to the weather conditions.

  • FSC 100% Ebony

    BOTANIC NAME: Diospyros crassiflora hiern.

    COMMON NAMES: African Ebony, Black Ebony.

    ORIGIN:  Central and Western Africa.

    DESCRIPTION: Ebony wood is the African black gold. It is very hard and it has a great finished in the lathe. It is spectacular for turning and excellent to combine with other woods. The Ebony wood is used in certain level of carving and decorations. This wood is fragile to the weather conditions.

  • Blackwood

    BOTANICAL NAME: Dalbergia melanoxylon.

    COMMERCIAL NAMES: Granadillo, African blackwood, Blackwood.

    ORIGIN: Mozambique, Tanzania.

    DESCRIPTION: It is a very dark wood with a density of 1250-1300 kg/m3. Its sapwood has a white-yellow color and its heartwood has a dark purple brown with striking traces or black grains. It has a fine grain and a straight fiber. When sawing, it requires the use of powerful machinery. Usually in wind instruments.

  • Tulipwood
    • Botanical Name: Dalbergia frutescens
    • Origin: Brasil
    • Density: 970-1040 Kg/m3
  • Kingwood

    BOTANIC NAME: Dalbergia cearensis.

    COMMON NAMES: Kingwood.

    ORIGIN: Brazil.

    DESCRIPTION: Density 1020 kg/m3. Heartwood is a dark purplish or reddish brown with darker black streaks. Sapwood is a pale yellow. Grain is usually straight; occasionally interlocked. Fine, uniform texture and a high natural luster.Tends to be difficult to work due to its high density. Kingwood has a moderate blunting effect on cutters, and tear out can occur during planning if interlocked grain is present. Can be difficult to glue due to natural oils and high density. Turns very well and takes a high polish.

  • Santos Rosewood

    BOTANIC NAME: Machaerium scleroxylon.

    COMMON NAMES: Pau Ferro, Morado, Bolivian Rosewood, Santos Rosewood.

    ORIGIN: Brazil.

    DESCRIPTION: Density 940 kg/m3. Colour can be highly varied, ranging from reddish/orange to a dark violet/brown, usually with contrasting darker black streaks. Narrow sapwood is a pale yellow and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Grain is typically straight, though sometimes slightly irregular or interlocked. Fine, even texture and a naturally high luster

  • Pequia

    BOTANIC NAME: Aspidosperma ponenposun
    COMMON NAMES: Pequia.
    ORIGIN: Brazil.
    DESCRIPTION: Wood of light yellow color whose density is of 1060 Kg/m3 with good sonorous qualities, it is a wood with slow drying speed. It is a wood very used for wind instruments.

  • Mopane

    BOTANICAL NAME: Colophospermum mopane

    ORIGIN: South Africa

    DENSITY: 1075kg/m3