Heels

Approximate Heels measures for Acoustic Guitars (150x100x76mm)

The heel is the nexus piece between the neck and the sounding board. Despite the heel seems one of the less important pieces of the guitar, it also has influence in the sound and the acoustic of the guitar, as well as being essential to give the right rigidity to the instrument.

Luthiers form all over the world have built guitars in different ways. One of the big differences when making the guitar lives in the heel. The common option is to make the heel with the same wood material as the guitar and the headplate, but there’re many more possibilities if you prefer to give a distinct touch to your instrument. Find them with the best quality at Maderas Barber.

Heels 

Subcategories

  • Curly Maple

    Maple has, without doubt, the best density-rigidity relationship among woods. This acoustic wood is one of the most used for making acoustic guitars.

    Heels have to support a great tension because they’re the only ones that join the neck to the guitar body, that’s why not all woods are good for making the heel. However, Maple has the proper qualities for doing this.

    BOTANICAL NAME: Acer pseudoplatanus

    ORIGIN: Central and East Europe

    DESCRIPTION: 610 – 680 kg/m3 density white wood. It has a white or light yellow colour, but the sapwood is no different from the heartwood. The rays are visible and appear as very thin decorative lines. The grain goes from straightness to unevenness, it’s also thin. The curl is a very appreciated quality for aesthetic reasons.

    SUGGESTIONS: Machining can present problems because of the intertwine grain. The util’s blunt is a common issue. It shows a good response when bending with the vapour. Both the gluing and the finish show no inconvenient. Wood is durable to fungus and sensible to termites. It gets dirty easily, it’s recommended not to keep it in humid places.

    DRYING: Drying at low temperature chambers is recommended to avoid colour changes and stains. If drying is fast, the wood will keep its white tonality.

    USES: A very versatile and requested wood, so it’s used for classic and acoustic guitar’ sounding board, also for Backs, Sides and Necks of Violin, Viola, Cello and Double Bass, as well as Electric Guitar and Bass’ Necks and Bodies. 

  • Mahogany (CITES)

    Mahogany Wood has a uniform density and is very easy to work with, specially by hand. Many luthiers choose this wood because of the tonal response and rigidity, as the heels support the guitar body weight and need this kind of density and rigidity. So it’s highly recommended for making acoustic guitar heels.

    BOTANICAL NAME: Swietenia macrophylla.

    COMMERCIAL NAMES: Mahogany, American Mahogany.

    ORIGIN: Brasil

    DESCRIPTION:490-530 kg/m3 density reddish brown wood. The sapwood colour is whitish or yellowish white and pink in the heartwood, but it gets reddish brown in time too. It frequently has very attractive grains. This is also straight, but slightly intertwined sometimes and its size goes form medium to thin.

    SUGGESTIONS: Machining is usually very easy, except in figured areas. Gluing and finishing are good. Direct contact can cause skin irritations.

    DRYING: Drying speed is fast with little deformation and crack risks.

    USES: This is a very versatile and demanded wood, so it’s used in Body tops and Electric Guitar and Bass bodies, purflings, heels, sounding boards and necks.

  • Honduras Cedar (CITES)

    Mahogany Wood has a uniform density and is very easy to work with, specially by hand. Many luthiers choose this wood because of the tonal response and rigidity, as the heels support the guitar body weight and need this kind of density and rigidity. So it’s highly recommended for making acoustic guitar heels.

    BOTANICAL NAME: Swietenia macrophylla.

    COMMERCIAL NAMES: Mahogany, American Mahogany.

    ORIGIN: Brasil

    DESCRIPTION:490-530 kg/m3 density reddish brown wood. The sapwood colour is whitish or yellowish white and pink in the heartwood, but it gets reddish brown in time too. It frequently has very attractive grains. This is also straight, but slightly intertwined sometimes and its size goes form medium to thin.

    SUGGESTIONS: Machining is usually very easy, except in figured areas. Gluing and finishing are good. Direct contact can cause skin irritations.

    DRYING: Drying speed is fast with little deformation and crack risks.

    USES: This is a very versatile and demanded wood, so it’s used in Body tops and Electric Guitar and Bass bodies, purflings, heels, sounding boards and necks.

  • Padouk

    Padouk is a very suitable wood for making necks and heels due to its good stability, timber and appearance.

    Heels have to support a great tension because the guitar body weight, so Padouk is a great option to make heels for its rigidity-stability relationship. This wood has a clean and clear sound and it’s easy to work with, so it’s a good option to be used in acoustic guitar heels.

    BOTANICAL NAME: Pterocarpues Tinctorius

    COMMERCIAL NAMES: Padouk, Camwood

    ORIGIN: Gabon

    DESCRIPTION: 825 Kg/m3 density Reddish Wood. The sapwood is whitish and the hartwood is red. The grain can be both straight or a bit intertwined, it’s also thick and rough.

    SUGGESTIONS: Padouk is easy to work with and presents no difficulties for hand work. It’s important to apply grain fillers before using finishing products.

    DRYING: Drying speed goes from regular to fast,it barely has deformation risks during the process.

    USES: Usually for xylophones and Guitar sounding boards.

  • African Mahogany

    African Mahogany has a perfect stability. The rigidity that it offers is perfect to support the guitar body weight. It has a halftone scale and very good vibration.

    Therefore, this wood is easy to work with, so we can get rounded edges heels using hand tools. Acquire the African Mahogany acoustic guitar heels at Maderas Barber.

    BOTANICAL NAME: Khaya ivorensis

    ORIGIN: Cameroon

    DESCRIPTION:490-530 kg/m3 density light colored wood. The sapwood colour is cream white and the heartwood colour is pale pink or pale red, getting dark into a more dark brown colour with a golden brightness. The grain is usually straight and medium sized.

    SUGGESTIONS: Drying speed is fast. There are deformation and cracking risks; those risks become bigger in tension woods or with a very intertwined grain.

    USES: This is a very versatile wood, apart from necks and heels, it’s also used for sounding boards, purflings and electric guitar and bass bodies.


Do you need help?
If you have any question, please contact and we will be happy to help you.

10 reasons to buy at MB