Wind Instruments

The wind instruments are those that contain a gaseous volume (generally air) capable of producing sound when it is conveniently expelled.

The wind instruments or aerophones are a family of musical instruments that produce the sound by the vibration of the wind and by the mass of air in its interior, without need of strings or membranes because it only requires the use of the wind.

The wind instruments can be classified into two categories. These categories are divided according to how the sound is produced:

       Brass instruments. The timbre is usually strong, bright and with a metallic sound. The sound in these instruments is produced by the vibration of the lips on a cup-shaped metal mouthpiece, which produces the acoustic frequency.

       Wooden instruments. The timbre of these instruments is softer and more melodious than that of brass. The sound is produced by blowing on a hole (bevel mouthpiece) or by vibrating a doble or single reed. 

Wind Instruments 

Subcategories

  • Clarinet

    The clarinet is a musical instrument of the woodwind instruments family that consists of a single reed mouthpiece. Within the orchestra, it is found in the woodwind section, next to the flute, oboe and bassoon.

    The body of the instrument can be made of wood (traditionally of ebony, cocobolo or granadillo). The beauty of its timbre makes it suitable for performing passages as a soloist as well as being an instrument of enormous agility and sonority, especially for the execution of trills and chromaticism. Normally the most used wood is the granadillo, but also the cocobolo and the ebony are used very frequently. 

  • English Horn

    The english horn is one of the musical instruments that belongs to the woodwind group, and within that group to the double reed subgroup, which is a derivate of the oboe due to the type of manufacture of which it is made and sometimes because of its timbre. The english horn is usually made of granadillo and cocobolo wood, these woods are perfect due to their acoustic and natural properties.

    It was for sure, the instrument that stood out most in military, until it came to be incorporated into many of the symphony orchestras

  • Dulzaina

    Is a wind traditional instrument of almost 30 cm long – although in can measure up to 20 cm more – with a cone shape that is played by means of a doble reed. It belongs to the oboe family; in fact, it’s sometimes called the rustic oboe.

    The dulzaina is composed of three different areas, the cup or upper part with the pressurized bowstring on the reed, the body, the central area of the instrument of about 18 cm, with seven holes in the front and one in the back, located between the first two front ones, and finally, the bell of 9 cm, which with a hole on each side is its natural amplifier.

    In Maderas Barber we use several types of wood with appropriate properties for the manufacture of this legendary instrument that dates its invention of the year 3,000 B.C. as are the granadillo, boxwood, cocobolo, kingwood, santos rosewood, tulip wood, ebony, pequia o bubinga.

  • Asturian Bagpipe

    The asturian bagpipe falls within the group of wind instruments or aerophones and the main characteristic is its air tank called the bellows.

    The different pieces that make up this group are the following:

    Bag made from the tanned hide skin of a goat, although it is currently manufactured in more modern materials. Stocks are the pieces that allow the union of the bag to the chanter, to the blowpipe and to the dron. Blowpipe is the part of the bagpipe that allows air to enter the bag and prevents it from escaping to the outside thanks to a leather reed. Dron is responsible for producing a low note called the bass, which sounds whenever the bagpipe is being played. It is composed of three parts and is assembled with each other thanks to the spikes. Chanter is in charge of producing the melody thanks to the to skill of the musician who covers and uncovers its holes. Its interior is conical.

    Generally, a wood is sought that weighs little, as good sonority, is resistant, and has an attractive appearance. Normally the most used wood is the boxwood, but ebony, granadillo, mopane, cocobolo, kingwood, santos rosewood, tulip wood, pequia or bubinga

  • C GALICIAN BAGPIPE

    C Galician Bagpipe is a wind instrument which, in its simplest form, consists of a preformed tube (pointer), provided with a reed and inserted into a wineskin, which is the air reserve. The air enters the wineskin through a second tube, which has a valve that prevents the exit of the air provided by the bagpiper's lungs. It compresses the wineskin with his arm to keep the air out with sound.

    The choice of wood could be subject to different variables such as the timbre character or the climatic conditions that the bagpipe in question will endure, but in the end, it is the bagpiper who, with his own knowledge and taste, decides which type of wood to use. For some years now, imported woods from tropical countries have been used due to their excellent physical and acoustic properties. Some of them are granadillo, boxwood, mopane or ebony.

    In the case of the Galician Bagpipe in the key of C, this type of gaita is the most used by the majority of bagpipers when playing with more bagpipes. The key of C is also appropriate for an accordionist or guitarist to adapt to our sound.

  • B Flat Galician Bagpipe

    The B Flat Galician Bagpipe is a wind instrument which, in its simplest form, consists of a pre-formed tube (pointer), provided with a reed and inserted into a wineskin, which is the air reserve. The air enters the wineskin (fol) through a second tube, which has a valve that prevents the exit of the air provided by the bagpiper's lungs. It compresses the wineskin with his arm to keep the air out with sound.

    The choice of wood could be subject to different variables such as the timbre character or the climatic conditions that the bagpipe in question will endure, but in the end, it is the bagpiper who, with his own knowledge and taste, decides which type of wood to use. For some years now, imported woods from tropical countries have been used due to their excellent physical and acoustic properties. Some of them are bubinga, boxwood, tulip wood, rosewood, kingwood, ebony, granadillo, mopane, santos rosewood or pequia.

    In the case of the Galician Bagpipe in the key of B flat, is this type of bagpipe that is most used by the majority of bagpipers when it is going to be played with more bagpipes. The C key is also suitable for an accordionist or guitarist to adapt to our sound.

  • Oboe

    Instrument of conical tube and doble reed, which assumes the soprano or mezzo voice in the wood family. The oboe family sometimes incorporates other members, such as the English horn or the love oboe. It is the smallest double-reeded instrument in the orchestra.

    Traditionally made of ebony or granadillo wood, can also be made of cocobolo; the instrument is made in three parts. The upper joint has 10 or 11 holes, most of which are manipulated by the musician’s left hand. The lower joint also has 10 holes, for most of which the player uses his right hand.

  • Other Measures of Bagpipes